Unspoken Work Rules For The New Girl

We have all had bosses who have disclosed WAY too much information about their personal life…but hey, to be honest who doesn’t love that? It shows that behind their sometimes unrealistic expectations and high demands, they have a real life outside the office also. Let’s face it, it’s always nice to share a good laugh and have an opportunity to bond. Unfortunately, that kind of bonding can often backfire. If you want respect in the workplace, it is best to keep your mouth zipped. That doesn’t mean you can’t listen and continue laughing, just be smart as to what you share in the conversation.

You better buckle-up if you choose to have too many TMI talks with your boss since what is said at work stays at work, and anything you say could be held against you during meetings or yearly reviews. This is an unspoken work rule that we should all know before entering the “the real world”.

Here are some other rules to know before your the new girl at the office…

1. Never admit you’re tired. Once you say those words, it could infer that you may
not be able to handle the job, schedule, or that maybe you have other issues that you
will soon be bringing to work. “I’m so tired today,” is a common phrase we all use in
the moment; but your boss isn’t going to offer any sympathy…or a nap time. Just
tuck it away and tuck yourself into bed earlier.

2. Pace yourself. This isn’t college where it’s normal to chug two energy drinks at your desk in order to be productive. This is your new reality, so you really need to pace yourself since this isn’t how life is going to be for just a semester. If you can, try to catch up on your sleep on the weekends, and on days you feel you have the energy to stay late at the office, go for it, but just don’t overdue. Reserve some of that energy since you don’t want to feel sleep deprived the next day.image

3. Don’t send novel long e-mails. 15 minutes after receiving an e-mail from your boss, you finally complete your most professional e-mail to send back!! Of course, disappointment sets in when you get the response, “OK, thanks.” Next time just make it simple and to the point.

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